Previous page...

How To View 3D Photos

There are many different ways to view 3D photos, but all achieve the same result - the left eye sees only the left image, and the right eye sees only the right image. The brain fuses these images together to see one image with depth.

3D Television

Viewing 3D images or 3D video on a 3D television while wearing 3D glasses is the easiest way to see 3D with excellent quality.


Following are different methods of viewing 3D from history:

Hand-held photo and slide viewers

Photos are typically displayed side-by-side. The viewer is held up to the eyes and the image is displayed through a lens which helps to focus the eyes.

Projection

Left and right images are projected onto a highly reflective screen through two separate aligned lenses each of which has a polarising filter. The polarisation of the left lens is 90 degrees to the polarisation of the right lens. When you wear glasses with same different polarisation the effect is that the left eye sees only the left image and the right eye sees only the right image.

Coloured Filtering

Two opposite colours are filtered out of the left and right images. One colour is added to the left image, and the opposite colour is added to the right image. The two images are then superimposed. When viewed through glasses with the same colours as that used in the filtering process, the effect is that the left eye sees only the left image and the right eye sees only the right image.

The most commonly used opposite colours are red and cyan, but red and green are also sometimes used.

Lenticular Prints

Lenticular viewing of 3D photos works by making some pixels (picture elements) direct the image to the left eye, while other pixels displaying the right image are directed to the right eye. This allows viewing of 3D photos in full colour without the need to wear special glasses.

This can be done for printed images. The more images that are available for lenticular prints, the better the effect will be. In the 1960s, Nimslo brand cameras were typically used for such prints. These cameras had four lenses.

3D LCD displays

Some displays alternate the left and right images. The 3D effect occurs when wearing LCD glasses that are synchronised to the display so that when the left image is visible on the screen, the right side of the glasses becomes opaque. Similarly, when the left image appears on the screen, the right side of the glasses blacks out. This change from left to right and back again is happening so quickly, that the brain is tricked into thinking that it is seeing one image.

Older technology that refreshed the display every 60th of a second meant that each image was refreshed only every 30th of a second, which gave the appearance of flicker which some people found unpleasant. Now with refresh rates typically at 120 Hertz, flicker is virtually eliminated.

The very latest 3D LCD displays use new technology that enables the viewing of 3D images in full colour without the need to wear special glasses.

This is achieved by directing individual pixels at the left and right eyes as required, and so as with all the other technologies the left eye sees only the left image and the right eye sees only the right image.

Fuji 3D viewer.

The latest Fuji Viewer, that displays full colour 3D photos and video without the need to wear special 3D glasses, is now available in Australia.

Previous page...

Andrew Host has been taking 3D photos since 1980.

Let's talk about the excitement of viewing your wedding photos in 3D.

Call now: 02 9460 0677.